Courses in the Winter Term 2020/21

Courses during Covid-19/ Corona

Due to the restrictions caused by the Corona-Virus, courses will be taught online utilizing programs such as Webex as well as the moodle platform. If you want to participate in a course, please write the lecturer an E-Mail for registration and further information. [Last updated: 16.10.2020]

B.A. Courses

History of Capitalism in the United States

Seminar

Lecturer: Felix Krämer

Modules: W04

Credit Points: 3

Date: Tuesday, 4 - 6 pm

Description: The course is an introduction to the history of capitalism in the United States. We are going to discuss new approaches to capitalism’s history. After sessions dealing with the colonial period or the American Revolution, we will turn to the nexus of slavery and capitalism. Furthermore, we are going to discuss labor unions and immigration in the 19th century and talk about the history of debts and debtors, as well as about economic crises, poverty and social policies in the 20th century. This will lead us to the beginnings of neoliberal discourses in the 1970s and finally to people who lost their homes in the course of the financial crisis after 2007/2008. By employing categories such as class, race, and gender, our discussion about the history of capitalism will illuminate in how far economic history mattered to various people in different ways.

The Politics of Property and Past. The Impact of the United States on the Practice of Restitution and Reparations in Germany, 1945-1998

Seminar

Lecturer: Anna Corsten

Modules: W9, W10, E8

Credit Points: 9

Date: Monday, 12 - 2 pm

Description: After the end of World War II, it became not only necessary to punish the perpetrators but also to compensate the victims for the crimes that had been committed between 1933 and 1945. The occupation policy of the Allies, in particular of the United States, strongly influenced the practice of restitution and reparations in East and West Germany. After the end of the Cold War, the United States kept impacting the practice in united Germany. This seminar looks at the practice of restitution and reparations in the broader context of the US policy towards Germany. Furthermore, it analyzes how social upheavals, the relevance of property and the perspective on the Nazi past influenced the practice of restitution and reparations.

19th Century US-History

Lecture

Lecturer: Jürgen Martschukat

Modules: W04

Credit Points: 3

Date: Wednesday, 10 am - 12 pm

Description: The lecture class will give an introduction to U.S.-history in the long 19th C. from the American Revolution to World War I. A focus will be on social and cultural history. A reader with sources will be provided as well as the weekly lecture in the form of a commented PPT file. In addition to that, I will be available each Wednesday at 11.15 am for a 30-minute question & answer and discussion session.

IPS - Memories

Seminar

Lecturer: Franziska Rantzsch/ Lisa Patt

Modules: W01

Credit Points: 9

Date: Monday, 2 - 4 pm / Thursday, 4 - 6 pm

Description: The seminar covers the topic of “memories/remembrance”, which is examined by specific examples in diverse historical contexts. The goal of the class is to make students familiar with the fundamental skills of academic work, and to get to know different areas and perspectives of historical scholarship and historical work. The first part of the course is taught by Franziska Rantzsch (Global History of the 19th Century), the second part by Lisa Patt (North American History).

M.A. Courses

History of Risk: Perils, Body Politics, and Epidemic Plagues from the 17th Century to the Present

Seminar

Lecturer: Felix Krämer

Modules: M12, M14, M15, M16

Credit Points: 6/9

Date: Wednesday, 12 - 2 pm

Description: Not only are risks an impending threat to any future they also do have a history. Actually, various types of risks even do have differing histories that the seminar will take into account from various angles. The perils of an epidemic – probably the most recent facet of the topic – is only one object of observation that we are approaching from the 17th century to the present. Poverty, crime, wars, traffic snarl, ecological calamities, health issues or credit risks are areas we will scrutinize in the course of our discussion in order to narrow them down based on selected primary sources and secondary literature to decipher them as specific discourses. The seminar is going to provide insight to transculturally shaped as well as regionally based phenomena. By unfolding different theoretical and methodological instruments, the course will open up perspectives for further research questions.

Antisemitism and Racism

Seminar

Lecturer: Vera Kallenberg

Modules: M12, M14, M15, M16

Credit Points: 6/9

Date: Tuesday, 2 - 4 pm

Description: Is antisemitism merely a variant of racism? How can we analytically grasp the specificity of modern and other forms of antisemitism and the characteristics of different forms of racism without ignoring the similarities? And how can we adequately discuss these phenomena, past and present, without offsetting them against each other and perpetuating a competition of suffering and victims?

The interdisciplinary seminar is devoted to theoretical-conceptual and historical-empirical investigations of antisemitism and racism. The focus is on modern antisemitism and anti-Black racism in Central Europe and the USA in the 20th century. In the first part, we discuss selected approaches to the causes and functioning of racism. In the second part, we discuss selected historical and social science theories on antisemitism. In the third part, we examine selected case studies on the entanglements and complex interrelationships between racism and antisemitism in the 20th century.

The seminar is aimed at students of history, cultural and social sciences. Students must be prepared to read theoretically challenging texts, to give a lecture in the seminar and to write a term paper. Please register in advance by sending an email to vera.kallenberg@uni-erfurt.de and provide information about your field of study, semester, and previous experience.

Colloquium North American History

Colloquium

Lecturer: Jürgen Martschukat

Modules: M12, M13, M14, M15, M16 

Credit Points: 6/9

Date: Wednesday, 6 - 8 pm every 2 weeks or two-day-session in December

Description: The class will discuss MA- and other research projects. Depending on the number of participants and the Corona-situation, we will either meet for a two-day-session in Dec. 2020 or each Friday from 10.15-11.45 am for video sessions. Participants are also invited to attend the colloquium of the Department of History every other Wednesday evening from 6-8 pm. MA-students are encouraged to register for the class and join the discussions. Please register by email until Oct. 30, 2020 the latest to juergen.martschukat@uni-erfurt.de. By then, I will be able to provide you with more information on the modus of the class.

PhD Program

Colloquium North American History

Colloquium

Lecturer: Jürgen Martschukat

Modules: -

Credit Points: -

Date: Wednesday, 6 - 8 pm every 2 weeks or two-day-session in December

Description: The class will discuss MA- and other research projects. Depending on the number of participants and the Corona-situation, we will either meet for a two-day-session in Dec. 2020 or each Friday from 10.15-11.45 am for video sessions. Participants are also invited to attend the colloquium of the Department of History every other Wednesday evening from 6-8 pm. MA-students are encouraged to register for the class and join the discussions. Please register by email until Oct. 30, 2020 the latest to juergen.martschukat@uni-erfurt.de. By then, I will be able to provide you with more information on the modus of the class.